Testimony

by Spencer Smolenski If five years ago you told me I would one day become a Catholic, I would have called you crazy. At that time, I identified as an  atheist, seeing religion as a superstition that irrationally placed  faith above reason. This idea pitted my lifelong interest in science 

First Spring

by Madeleine Roberts From the first spring we learned enough  of mauve and purple petalstuff,  wisteria curled in peacock plumes,  and Eden’s honeysweet perfumes,  to know that dying never fits  the ground, and though the earth forgets  the sound of its revival song,  the winter cannot linger long.

Tears of a Teacher

by Walker Haynes Many people with a faith background will know that John 11:35 is the shortest verse in the Bible. It simply reads, “Jesus wept.” The brevity of the verse does not indicate a lack of meaning. Toward the beginning of his over 6500-word sermon on this verse, the

Sun

by Madeleine Busse Streets stained white with salt  Like bleached desert bones  Nakedly reflect cold light,  Bordering grass brown from snow now gone.   On my walk to class, the sun emerges:  The wind still slices, but the sky is blue  Windows once grey glow with midmorning   Stone walls catch

Flood

by Madeleine Roberts When the rocks cried out for weeping  I knelt to the ground and wept.  This sphere is too great for cupped hands   like water at the fountainhead  overflowing, baptism of reflections.  I am quiet multitudes past   the sum of my fears, though the hours waver  in high

Stumbling

by Jack Moore   Thursday Night “It’s so loud.”As I lie on my bed, all I can do is listen. The ticking of a clock, the purring of a fan, the voices downstairs…I can’t sleep, but that’s been a problem for a while. I need my clock to know what

Yes, He Meets Us Where We Are

By Stiven Peter In his “Conversations with Picasso,” Hungarian photographer Brassai claims that Grunewald’s Crucifixion  awakened Picasso’s creative impulses. Specifically, he attributes Picasso’s extremes, “his amorously irreverent pastiches, his verve, his humor, his cruelty,” to the grotesque impulse generated by Grunewald. Picasso remarked to Brassai, “Do you know the Crucifixion